I’m watching live coverage of President Trump’s inauguration while reading Mark 15. The contrast is stark, but with both accounts, every detail is scrutinized.

Donald Trump’s every foot step is broadcast world-wide. He and his wife Melania leave Blair house this morning with great pomp and circumstance.

Jesus was brought to Pilate’s house without fanfare and in the dead of night.

An inaugural church service at St. John’s Church will feature a sermon from the book of Nehemiah by a Dallas senior pastor.

Jesus stood alone as his closest friends ran, hid, and denied.

Trump is expected to give a 20-minute speech touting his vision of making America great again. Thousands of supporters will cheer.

Jesus remained silent, and Pilate was amazed.

During the inauguration parade, a sea of supporters in red Trump hats will wave and cheer again. Hundreds in Jerusalem brutally called out, “Crucify him!”

Including the multiple gala balls—three of which the Trumps will attend—the inauguration will cost an estimated $200 million. The price of Jesus’s coronation was his own blood.

At 9:30 this morning, the Obamas and Trumps will meet for tea and coffee.

Jesus was offered a crude sponge filled with vinegar on the end of a Roman spear.

As he takes the oath of office, Donald Trump will place his hand on two Bibles—the Lincoln Bible, and the Bible he’s owned since childhood.

Jesus’s hands were pierced with spikes as the oath of a new covenant was being nailed to a roughly hewn, wooden cross.

Donald Trump will say, “So help me, God.” Jesus said, “I am God,” and “It is finished.”

Some are very excited about this inaugural day. Some are in deep turmoil. Many will cheer, and many will protest. Andrew Delbanco, in his book The Real American Dream, suggests that there are three sources of hope for all Americans: God, nation, and self.

Your perspective on this inauguration day probably depends on where your hope comes from. As Christians, we operate differently from those without faith.

On Sunday, we’ll talk about another way in which the church is to be different and impact our culture. This is our third and final Sunday of our “ABCs of Community” series. The “C” is “caring.” How we do this sets us apart from everyone else. How we care for each other is determined by whether we focus more on the leader today who says, “So help me, God,” or on the leader who says, “I Am God.”

See you Sunday at 9:00 or 11:00 a.m.
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Blessings!

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